The Garden Community for Garden Lovers

Xela's Garden

Californian Lilac [V]

Genus: Ceanothus.

Species: Ceanothus.

Ceanothus is an evergreen or deciduous shrub or small tree. They flower either in late spring or mid to late summer depending on the variety.

They are often called California Lilacs because the flowers of some varieties are similar to the Lilac Tree (syringa), and ceanothus do originate form California.

The flowers are most noted for the varieties which produce masses of deep blue flowers. But they also come with pink or white flowers.

Quick growing, Ceanothus are great shrubs for filling gaps in a few years. We highly recommend this beautiful shrub.

Planted ? Vistabile back patio fence
Bought ?
Botanical Name Ceanothus
Common Name California Lilac
Type Deciduous or evergreen shrub; spring or summer flowering.
Size
(after 5 years) Varies considerably depending on the variety
Position Full sun.
Soil Light and well-drained
Hardy Yes but depends on the variety
Flower Blue, pink or white
Foliage Dark green
Scent No
Season of
Interest Spring or summer depending on the variety.
Propagate Semi-ripe cuttings in mid July,

Ceanothus are frost hardy but not a deep frost. However, if they are given a warm, sheltered and sunny position they will produce a magnificent flower display and lovely glossy deep green leaves.
[Source: www.gardenaction.co.uk/plantfinder/ceanothus-california-lilac_1.asp]

Photos of this plant

  • Vistabileceanothusin_bloom_14.05.08
  • Ceanothus_in_full_bloom_vistabiletrellis.14.05.08
  • Ceanothus_coloursvistabilepatio14.05.08

Reminders for this plant

Due about 16 years ago:

Prune

Cut new wood ( old wood will not produce new shoots) to maintain the shape of the plant.

Due almost 16 years ago:

Take cuttings

STEP 1
Take the cutting from this year's growth. Select a shoot where the tip is soft new growth, but the lower part is harder older growth. Using a sharp knife, take a cutting 15-20cm (6-8in) long. If possible, select a shoot which has no flowers or buds on it.
Remove any leaves from the lower part of the shoot and cut it immediately below a leaf joint. Cut off the soft new growth at the top of the shoot just above a leaf joint. The ideal cutting should now be about 5-10cm (2-4in long).

STEP 2
For each cutting, fill an 8cm (3in) pot with potting compost. Dip the base of the cutting in hormone rooting powder, make a small hole in the compost and insert the cutting into the hole to about a third of it's length. Firm the compost down around the cutting. Water well.

STEP 3
To prevent the cuttings loosing too much water. place the pots in a small propagator with the vents closed. Alternatively, cover each pot with a plastic bag kept off the cuttings by wire hoops inserted into the compost. Place the cuttings in a warm, draught free place which is always out of direct sunlight. A propagator is ideal or against the house wall.

STEP 4
The cuttings will have rooted in a month or so. At this stage, harden them off over a week or two to the normal weather. During the winter, the plants need the protection of a cold frame or unheated greenhouse. The plants can be planted in their final positions next spring.

Due about 15 years ago:

Prune

Cut new wood ( old wood will not produce new shoots) to maintain the shape of the plant.

Due almost 15 years ago:

Take cuttings

STEP 1
Take the cutting from this year's growth. Select a shoot where the tip is soft new growth, but the lower part is harder older growth. Using a sharp knife, take a cutting 15-20cm (6-8in) long. If possible, select a shoot which has no flowers or buds on it.
Remove any leaves from the lower part of the shoot and cut it immediately below a leaf joint. Cut off the soft new growth at the top of the shoot just above a leaf joint. The ideal cutting should now be about 5-10cm (2-4in long).

STEP 2
For each cutting, fill an 8cm (3in) pot with potting compost. Dip the base of the cutting in hormone rooting powder, make a small hole in the compost and insert the cutting into the hole to about a third of it's length. Firm the compost down around the cutting. Water well.

STEP 3
To prevent the cuttings loosing too much water. place the pots in a small propagator with the vents closed. Alternatively, cover each pot with a plastic bag kept off the cuttings by wire hoops inserted into the compost. Place the cuttings in a warm, draught free place which is always out of direct sunlight. A propagator is ideal or against the house wall.

STEP 4
The cuttings will have rooted in a month or so. At this stage, harden them off over a week or two to the normal weather. During the winter, the plants need the protection of a cold frame or unheated greenhouse. The plants can be planted in their final positions next spring.

Due about 13 years ago:

Prune

Cut new wood ( old wood will not produce new shoots) to maintain the shape of the plant.

Due almost 13 years ago:

Take cuttings

semi ripe cuttings mid July

Due almost 11 years ago:

Prune

Use secateurs to shorten over-long branches by up to a half in midsummer after flowering. Do not cut into older wood as the stumps may not regrow.

Take cuttings

semi ripe cuttings mid July ... see previous notes