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Xela's Garden

Cape Tulip [S]

Genus: Homeria.

Species: Homeria ?.

Planted 05.08 Shenstone rose bed

Bought @ Woolworths £2.99 for pack of 12 mixed

Flowers:July - Sept

Height: 30cm

Named after Homer, the epic Greek poet, Homeria is a South African native produced from corms.
Although there are about 32 known species (now part of Moraea), many are not commercially cultivated and are still found growing in the wild.
The slender, grass-like foliage and unusual-shaped, bicolored flowers range from yellow and orange to salmon-pink.

Homeria plants prefer sunny locations in well-drained, sandy soil. Plant Homeria corms in the spring or fall approximately 1-2 inches deep. Since Homerias have very small corms, do not plant the corms too deeply or too far apart. In fact, a good way to plant them is by massing them in small groups.

The corms that are planted in the spring will bloom later in the summer, while corms planted in the fall will flower in the spring. Although the individual flowers do not last long, the plant produces so many of them that the flowering displays can be enjoyed for a long period of time.

Mature plants reach about 2 feet tall; use them as mass plantings in beds and borders for greatest effect, where their unusual color can be appreciated. The Homeria's unusual shapes and colors also make it particularly useful as a container-grown plant.

During winter in colder regions, it is better to lift the corms and store them in a dry, frost-free environment. In other regions, they can remain undisturbed in the soil with an adequate layer of mulch for winter protection.

H. collina (M. collina ) ranges in color from salmon to a deep yellow and blooms profusely, making it a good "filler" plant, growing where many others will not.

Another species, H. comptonii (M.comptonii) changes in color from lemon yellow centers to salmon-pink tips and is also coconut scented. This species blooms in late spring to early summer.

H. elegans (M. elegans) has bright yellow flowers with green-tinged or pale orange petals and blooms in late winter or early spring. It is a very striking species.

H. lilacina produces an abundance of lilac-colored flowers in early summer.

H. flaccida (M. flaccida ) has yellow or salmon flowers with a yellow center blooms in spring.

H. miniata (M. miniata ) is very widespread and in some places considered a nuisance. It has salmon flowers, sometimes yellow or white, and a speckled center.

Photos of this plant

Reminders for this plant

Due over 15 years ago:

Lift


During winter in colder regions, it is better to lift the corms after the first frost and store them in a dry, frost-free environment. In other regions, they can remain undisturbed in the soil with an adequate layer of mulch for winter protection.


Plant


Plant Homeria corms in the spring or fall approximately 1-2 inches deep. Since Homerias have very small corms, do not plant the corms too deeply or too far apart. In fact, a good way to plant them is by massing them in small groups.

The corms that are planted in the spring will bloom later in the summer, while corms planted in the fall will flower in the spring.

Due over 14 years ago:

Lift

During winter in colder regions, it is better to lift the corms after the first frost and store them in a dry, frost-free environment. In other regions, they can remain undisturbed in the soil with an adequate layer of mulch for winter protection.

Plant

Plant Homeria corms in the spring or fall approximately 1-2 inches deep. Since Homerias have very small corms, do not plant the corms too deeply or too far apart. In fact, a good way to plant them is by massing them in small groups.

The corms that are planted in the spring will bloom later in the summer, while corms planted in the fall will flower in the spring.

Due about 13 years ago:

Plant

Plant Homeria corms in the SPRING or fall approximately 1-2 inches deep. Since Homerias have very small corms, do not plant the corms too deeply or too far apart. In fact, a good way to plant them is by massing them in small groups.

The corms that are planted in the spring will bloom later in the summer, while corms planted in the fall will flower in the spring.

Due almost 13 years ago:

Plant

Plant Homeria corms in the Spring or AUTUMN approximately 1-2 inches deep. Since Homerias have very small corms, do not plant the corms too deeply or too far apart. In fact, a good way to plant them is by massing them in small groups.

The corms that are planted in the spring will bloom later in the summer, while corms planted in the fall will flower in the spring.

Mulch

mulch for winter protection.

Due over 12 years ago:

Plant

Plant Homeria corms approximately 1-2 inches deep. Since A good way to plant them is by massing them in small groups.
The corms that are planted in the spring will bloom later in the summer.

Due about 11 years ago:

Plant

See previous notes

Due almost 11 years ago:

Plant

See previous notes

Mulch

See previous notes