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Rhipsalis

hywel

By hywel

33 comments


Not all cacti grow in arid places. Some grow as epiphytes on the branches of trees in the tropical forests of mid and south America.
One genus of such cacti are the Rhipsalis
and I would like to show you some photos of the ones I’ve got.

The first three I have had for many years, and they are quite big plants now (although not as big as they’d be if they were growing wild)

1. Rhipsalis pilocarpa is a very rare species from eastern areas of Brazil, around Rio de Janeiro etc :-

After the flowers fall, these red berries appear :-

R pilocarpa is rare in the wild and is apparently only known in eight localities.
Loss of habitat due to expanding agriculture and urbanization is the main reason for its decline :(

.

2. Rhipsalis baccifera, native to the Carribbean area and parts of tropical Africa, is known commonly as ‘mistletoe cactus’ – because that’s what it looks like :-

It gets these tiny little flowers along the stems. They really are small, and it’s easy to miss them if you don’t know they’re there …

After the flowers some lovely white berries will form :)

If you look closely at the next photo you’ll be able to see some flowers and berries on the same plant :-

.

3. Rhipsalis cereuscula is characterised by lots of tiny cylindrical stems borne at the ends of long slender branches -
another ‘Mistletoe Cactus’ …

It’s found in eastern parts of Brazil, Uruguay, and northern Argentina,
and has tufty white flowers :)

It should produce white or red berries after the flowers finish, but mine has never done so.
Maybe next year …:)

.

The next three are new and I’m not sure of their names. I tried to identify them from images but I’m not sure if I’ve got them right.

4. I believe this one to be Rhipsalis capilliformis (Old Man’s Beard)
It is native originally to Brazil.

It has very thin long stems and will look nice in a hanging basket after it grows a bit :)

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5. Rhipsalis ewaldiana ? That’s what it most resembles on the images I saw – flattened stems and trailing.

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6. Rhipsalis burchellii ? – well that’s what the label sais but it does not look like the images I saw.
We’ll see how it grows …

I can’t wait to see if my Rhipsalis cacti will flower again next spring. They are fascinating plants :)

More blog posts by hywel

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Comments

 

They are certainly spectacular as well as mysterious looking plants, some of them.
I think you have a lot of patience to grow these.

19 Oct, 2016

 

They are fantastic Hywel.......love them.

19 Oct, 2016

 

What unusual plants Hywel, do they stay outside through the winter?

19 Oct, 2016

 

Amazing! The white flowers on the first couple of pictures remind me of small snowflakes...! :o) Great photographs as always Hywel!

19 Oct, 2016

 

How fascinating Hywel..you must do lots of research to find what you want..they will have the best home with you,that's for sure :o).

19 Oct, 2016

 

They're amazing Hywel - the mistletoe cactus doesn't even look like a cactus at all in the photos - guess you have to get up close?
How did you manage to find that very rare one? You must have been thrilled to bits! Thank you for showing them.

19 Oct, 2016

 

Thank you all for reading about my cacti, and for your comments :)

I suppose I have patience with them because I find them so interesting Paul. I have no patience with lawns or vegetables because I find them boring :)

They never go outside Ginellie. I keep them in the conservatory all the time. It's heated so they never get cold even in winter.
I only put them outside to have their photos taken because of the light :)

Yes Petaltracey they also remind me of snowflakes, and they are rather papery :)

Sandra I do read up about cacti, and go out of my way to look for them. That's because I am so interested in them. I've got 3 pages full of cacti on my Amazon wishlist lol :D

Sue I found them all in Wyevale, except for R ceruscula. I found that one in Lidl :D
If you look closely at the mistletoe cacti you'll be able to see they've got areoles with hairs coming from them instead of spines. The flowers arise from the areoles like in all cacti, and they have the same arrangement of parts :)

20 Oct, 2016

 

Found this blog so interesting and thank you for passing on all that you know about these fascinating and unusual plants. The tiny flowers are so dainty and very pretty.
I hope they do well for you for many years to come. Thanks Hywel.

20 Oct, 2016

 

As I began reading your Blog, Hywel I thought 'Oh, these sound a bit like Mistletoe' and then low and behold what was the next photo?...yes that's right. Is there any family connection to the common Mistletoe I wonder?
Your collection is fascinating, thank you for sharing it.

20 Oct, 2016

 

I did look for aureoles Hywel and couldn't see any - never thought of the flowers having grown from them as they do in other cacti - they are very inconspicuous! Time to go back to Specsavers...

20 Oct, 2016

 

Oh Wow Hywel, you really have some wonderful ones there don't you, I can see me looking out for some of them, I love the one with the tufty white flowers, and the hanging ones, I don't remember ever seeing them anywhere so thankyou for showing yours....

20 Oct, 2016

 

Thank you all :)

There is no connection between these plants and the common Mistletoe Waddy. These belong to the cactus family, because the flower structure is the same as in the desert cacti - ie they have the same arrangement of petals, stamens etc.
Mistletoe is a parasitic plant belonging to another family where the petals etc have a different arrangement :)

Sue Steragram if you look at the closeup photo of the single berry you'll be able to see some very fine hairs. They arise from the areoles. They are not visible in 'real life' but the camera has picked them up.

20 Oct, 2016

 

Oh yes, I see them now - and some on the stem on the left as well. Thank you!

20 Oct, 2016

 

Very educational for me Hywel. Thank you for sharing.
Such interesting plants and your knowledge about them is admirable.

20 Oct, 2016

 

Glad you could see them Sue :)

Thanks Klahanie :)

20 Oct, 2016

 

Fascinating blog and plants Hywel the flowers are beautiful ,thanks for sharing :-) , they remind me of spiders legs close up ;-)

21 Oct, 2016

 

Ah yes, those hairy spider legs lol
Thanks for looking at my blog Simbad :)

21 Oct, 2016

 

Wonderful collection you have there Hywel I love them all . Did you manage to find the rats tails you lost a while back .

21 Oct, 2016

 

Thank you Thrupennybit.
Yes I did get another rats tail but it is very small at the moment :)

21 Oct, 2016

 

one reminds me off a mistletoe , thanks for sharing , as always a fascinating read.
Gg

22 Oct, 2016

 

Thank You :)

22 Oct, 2016

 

What a fabulous display Hywel, makes for a very interesting blog - gone on my favourites.

24 Oct, 2016

 

Thanks again, Hywel, for these lovely photos of some of your Cacti! You really know how to make it fascinating! Many people who don't like Cacti will be very surprised at some of the species there are out there!

I liked your "Mistletoe" ones as I'd never seen them before! The white berries make the plants look a lot like mistletoe!

24 Oct, 2016

 

Thank you both :)

24 Oct, 2016

 

So pleased you found one . It will soon grow Hywel with you looking after it.?

25 Oct, 2016

 

Thanks. I'm pleased you have confidence in me ... lol :D

25 Oct, 2016

 

I have every confidence in you Hywel I see it as your calling ?

26 Oct, 2016

 

Thanks :)

27 Oct, 2016

 

?

31 Oct, 2016

 

Yes, fascinating plants, Hywel ... very interesting set of pics.

12 Nov, 2016

 

Thank you TT :) x

12 Nov, 2016

 

If my friend gave me a clipping, how do I grow roots?

9 Apr, 2017

 

Amy Hywel isn't on goy at present so I hope this will help:

Its a bit different from cuttings from most cacti - you can use ordinary potting compost with added coarse sand or gritie a good fertile open compost. Just put the cutting into it and wait - doesn't need watering until it has some root, but because it is a epiphyte it would benefit from an occasional slight spray of water as they enjoy a humid atmosphere- not much as you don't want it to rot. Also as they grow on trees like orchids they don't like to be in full sun all day.
The cutting needs to be taken at the junction of two stems.

10 Apr, 2017

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