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Fasciation on Foxglove


Fasciation on Foxglove

Spotted this strange growth and believe it is fasciation. Seems harmless but unsure of why it happens.



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Pretty coloured foxglove, Shirley. I don’t know much about them, but I’ve learned something new today.

11 Jun, 2021

 

Kate, here is an explanation of it:

Fasciation is a genetic mutation of a plant's growing tip, and it can visibly affect the stem, flowers, or fruits. It often leads to multiple extra flowers being produced on the affected stems, typically with many secondary blooms surrounding the normal, expected one. The flowers themselves may be flattened or elongated, crushed together, or otherwise misshapen in ways which may or may not be interesting or appealing to the eye.

Sometimes, the effects can be obvious, creating grossly oversized stems and flowers with a weirdly grotesque look. The closer to the ground that fasciation happens, the more exaggerated its effects tend to be.

But sometimes the results are much less dramatic. The growing shoots can be flattened, splayed apart, or may seem to be made up of several stems fused into one. The flowers may be subtly malformed rather than hugely so, and may stay single rather than producing abnormal bunches or sprays.

It is only the second time I have seen this strange effect!

11 Jun, 2021

 

I've never seen this before. Thanks for the explanation.

11 Jun, 2021

 

I often find delphiniums do this. often caused by a virus that causes cell division to go haywire due to the mutation.

11 Jun, 2021

 

Thank you, Shirley, that’s a very informative explanation.
Very interesting!

11 Jun, 2021

 

Ha ha Kate, every day's a school day!!

Lindak, you're welcome. I couldn't explain it as well as the article I copied and pasted does ... :o)

Sbg, thanks for that.

11 Jun, 2021

 

Well I never! You learn something new every day :-)

14 Jun, 2021

 

This is true Julia!!

14 Jun, 2021

 

Fascinating Fasciation! 😂 😂 😂 Sorry, couldn't help myself! 😂
A couple of years ago I had the same thing happen on the tomato flowers on the balcony but the most curious thing about it was that it only ever happened to the lead flower on each truss! When I realised what was happening whenever I saw the lead bud swelling I picked it off as nothing ever became of the flower, i.e, no tomatoes formed from them. The rest of the flowers in the truss grew properly & produced fruit as expected.

I wonder if that is what produced the flowers known as 'Cockscomb'?

17 Jun, 2021

 

David, how interesting re the Tomatoes. Here is some info. regarding the Cockscomb flower:

Celosia (/siːˈloʊʃiə/ see-LOH-shee-ə[2]) is a small genus of edible and ornamental plants in the amaranth family, Amaranthaceae. The generic name is derived from the Ancient Greek word κήλεος (kḗleos), meaning "burning",[3] and refers to the flame-like flower heads. Species are commonly known as woolflowers, or, if the flower heads are crested by fasciation, cockscombs.[4] The plants are well known in East Africa's highlands and are used under their Swahili name, mfungu.

Looks as though you are right ... well done!

17 Jun, 2021

 

Thanks, Shirley! I read a similar article yesterday!

18 Jun, 2021



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