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Carnivorous Plants

siris

By siris

5 comments


I went to Hant Carniverous plants today to buy some additions to my collection.
It was amusing to find the owner mixing the peat and vermiculite for bog potting compost on an industrial scale in a cement mixer.
In the greenhouse many Sarracenias were already in flower, being prepared for Chelsea.
Here are some pictures of the flowers of the ones similar to my last year’s purchases. As mine are outside the growth is not as advanced as these and the plants too young to flower yet.

This is a flower that has been pollinated. You can tell because the petals are upturned.

Perhaps this S. alta is one I might buy next year.

Outside the owner has a trial bog bed of Sarracenias, to test which do best outdoors all year round, for the R.H.S.

Pictured below is the tray in my pond at the beginning of March. Note the empty pot awaiting a new plant.

Here are pictures of my new purchases,
A Darlingtonia californica

Drosera anglica, a British native Sundew

Also a Sarracenia hybrid, for the pot, but no photo yet.

Three of my originals have flowers developing on them, which I will photograph when fully developed.

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Comments

 

Must be great to have a look around the nursery.

Your tray is looking good ....

Gg

12 Apr, 2017

 

I have tremendous admiration for anyone specialising in these strange plants. Like something out of the primeval past. Not for me !

12 Apr, 2017

 

Gg, Last time I went was November and the plants were shutting down for winter, this time the Sarracenia were in flower or starting to do so. I have extended the collection into the top pond.

12 Apr, 2017

 

an interesting group of plants aren't they.
thankyou for sharing your interesting day out.

12 Apr, 2017

 

Very interesting to talk to the grower, and get expert advice about growing them. He explained that most Sarracenia will grow outdoors, here in the South, but not in the North. As they are native to the USA, those derived from Georgia would have growing conditions more similar to here, but the Florida and Alabama ones won't grow so prolifically. Easily grown in a cool greenhouse.

13 Apr, 2017

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